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Table 3 Comparison of various 0D models for the systemic vasculature

From: Review of Zero-D and 1-D Models of Blood Flow in the Cardiovascular System

Model configuration Advantages Disadvantages
  RC model Reveals the general storage properties of large arteries and the dissipative nature of small peripheral vessels with the simplest model structure Cannot simulate the effect of high frequency components in the arterial impedance, can not accurately match the aortic pressure and flow-rate waveforms Venous pressure is assumed to be zero and thus venous pressure fluctuations cannot be described. Cannot describe the pressure and flow-rate changes in specific segments of the vasculature; cannot simulate the pulse wave transmission effect
Mono-compartment model RCR model Simple, and gives a better description of the high frequency components in the arterial impedance than the RC model Can not describe the features of the secondary maximum and a discrete minimum in the medium frequency range of the arterial impedance.   
  RLCR model Simple, and offers improved description of the secondary maximum and a discrete minimum in the medium frequency range of the arterial impedance than the RCR model Parameter setting is more difficult than for the RCR and RC models, which limited its applications.   
  RLCRCLR model Simplest model that accounts for venous pressure fluctuations The model structure is complex compared with RC, RCR and RLCR models, thus parameter setting is more difficult.  
Multiple compartment model Flexible combination of RLC network elements to describe the vessel characteristics to whatever level of detail required. Captures, within the limitations of the model, pulse wave transmission effects. More complex to implement than the mono-compartment models. Difficult to determine appropriate RLC parameters when the model includes many vessel segments.